If you have a free hand while brewing coffee here’s a little inspiration to try harder.
#camping #doublechemex #kellensoo #nicragua #laborday

Summer time is upon us with all its glory. BBQ’s, block party’s, the beach and traveling. Going away for a vacation can be a breath of fresh air for us all. However if you ever find yourself enjoying vacation but not your morning coffee, here is the fix. After talking with some good friends who love the places they go but not the coffee or espresso they find in shops there, we thought about what you can pack to help make your morning coffee as fantastic as the enjoying the sunrise on vacation.

First having a grinder is key to keeping whole beans and ensuring freshness. We sell YAMA ($25) and HARIO ($35) handgrinders that use burrs and work very well. Next, get your brew device. We sell a Chemex kit (includes kettle, filters, bag of beans and chemex $75) and aeropress. Since it is hot, cold brewing the coffee will be an easy way to also provide coffee for all your loved ones with you. 

Next, get some great beans. You can find these beans from us currently:

Colombia, Granja La Esperanza

Honey - Cherry - Toffee

Origin – Colombia, Valle de Cauca
Varietal - Caturra
Method - Traditional Washed Process
Organic Certification GB-ORG-04 and Rainforest Alliance Certified

image

El Salvador, Finca Las Nubes

Fig – Raisin – Chocolate

Origin – El Salvador, San Salvador
Varietal – Bourbon
Method – Semi washed and dried on raised beds (sometimes referred to as “honey” processed)
Relationship Trade

image

Nicaragua, Finca Santa Teresa

Peach – Apricot – Toffee

Origin – Nicaragua, Los Planes Diplito
Varietal – Maragogype
Relationship Trade

Last night, we hosted this month’s Thursday Night Throwdown, a latte art competition where baristas from around the city joined together to compete for a cash prize. Twenty talented people brought their best hearts, rosettas, and tulips. During the competition, everyone in attendance enjoyed Iron Hill Brewery’s Greenstreet Brown Ale which is made using our Ethiopian Kochere coffee. We just want to thank everyone who came out to compete or support. It was a great night for all!image

Above: Our winner, Jonathan Amos (left) and runner-up, Ben Contois. Nice work, gentleman!

When you walk into Greenstreet Coffee Co., you can’t miss our display of the wide range of brew methods available for purchase. We understand that this could be a bit intimidating to some. You might be thinking, “Don’t they all do the same thing…brew coffee?” This is true, but from the French Press Pot to the Hermiston, each brew method yields a unique cup every time.

Let’s discuss the major differences, shall we?

Yama French Press Pot: This is a full immersion brewer with a metal filter that allows for a heavy, whole-mouth feel. Because it uses a plunger, its easy to over extract if the coffee makes contact with water for too long. Perfect brew time is about 4 minutes.

Chemex: Brews coffee without imparting any flavors of its own. This method is similar to a drip, but since you’re brewing by hand, you have more control over variables like time, temperature, grind size, and coffee-to-water ratio. Different variations can yield a denser or less dense cup of coffee, or more overall clarity. In general, a Chemex makes a well-balanced cup in about 3 minutes.

Hermiston Pot: Boasting a metal mesh filter, this brewer allows more compounds to pass through, which yields a bigger body. The metal filter makes it similar to French Press, but since its a pour-over (like a Chemex!), there’s no room for over extraction. And since you’re not plunging it like the French Press, there won’t be any messy coffee residue. This one could pass as a French Press/Chemex hybrid.

Aeropress: This is a full immersion brewer that yields rich flavor without all the bitterness. Even though all the oils are absorbed by the paper filter, the coarse grind size will allows for a full body to develop. Aeropress brews coffee in a similar way to espresso because of the force of pressure. In a rush? You can make a good, dense coffee in 1 minute.

image

Top left: Chemex, Top right: Yama French Press Pot

Bottom left: Aeropress, Bottom right: Hermiston Pot

Everyone loves a good iced coffee once the weather gets warm. Here at Greenstreet, our iced coffee is never hot, which means it’s never bitter. We have two methods that we use to make our cold brew coffee: Toddy and the Kyoto. When you come to our cafe for your iced coffee fix, we generally have both methods available for you to choose from. Let’s cover the differences so you know which one you might prefer.

image

Toddy cold brew: in the Toddy, coffee grinds steep in cold water for up to 12 hours. The cold water extracts all of the compounds that yield a delicious cup of coffee without all of the bitterness, oils and fatty acids you might notice in a hot cup.

image

Kyoto (slow drip): this method requires ice cold water to drip (one drip per second) into coffee grinds through a pre-moistened filter. The water droplets pass through the coffee into a larger reservoir where all the brewed coffee collects. This process takes up to 12 hours. The drip tower yields a smooth, rich coffee with very low acidity.

Picture this. A small space on Alter Street in Philadelphia with white brick walls, shelves of bagged coffee ready to be delivered, pallets of burlap bags filled with green coffee awaiting the roaster, and a sole Ambex roaster where the Greenstreet magic happens. This is where days are dedicated to sustainability, transparency, and quality coffee.

The day starts by cleaning out the roaster to ensure the safest and smoothest roasting process possible. Next, at least 8 hours a day roasting to fulfill orders for local Philadelphia businesses and for our cafe. Leaning over the roaster, paying close attention to temperature and air flow, Tom likes to think of himself as a pilot or a ship captain; attention to detail is key, and there is no room for error.

Each batch of coffee takes 14-22 minutes depending upon the roast profile. The roaster brings the coffee to its desired roasting temperature, then Tom releases it to be cooled. Greenstreet roasts upwards of 1000 pounds of coffee per week, with each batch maxing out at 30 pounds. Our most popular coffee to date is the Ethiopian Kellensoo.

Chris uses his office space in the roaster to make phone calls, send emails, receive orders, and everything else that keeps the logistics of running the roaster in order.

Between roasting, bagging, and delivering over a thousand pounds of coffee per week, we’ve got our hands full over on Alter Street.

This past Wednesday, we held our first coffee brewing class here at 11th and Spruce. Greenstreet Coffee Co. Brew School is our new series of classes in which we teach YOU how to brew Greenstreet coffee by some less conventional methods. Our first class was “Full Immersion 101” covering French Presses and Vacuum Siphons. It was an overall success.

Jeremy, cafe manager and super barista, led the class, opening up by demonstrating one of our most popular in-house methods, the Siphon brewer. The class attendees got to try two different Greenstreet coffee brewed in Siphon pots. Following the Siphons, we jumped into French presses, which was a little more hands-on. With five french press pots, we gave everyone the option of coming up and being the barista, brewing a fresh pot for everyone to try, totaling five different Greenstreet coffees.

Everyone got to try our popular coffees side by side and enjoy some fresh baked goods. Some even went home with a bag or two of their favorite Greenstreet coffee beans. We’re sending a big thanks to everyone who came out to brew school! Everyone had a great time and left well-caffeinated.

Sorry you missed out on the fun? Our next brew class will be Wednesday, May 7th at 6pm and we’ll be learning all about cold brew and Chemex! This time we’ll get to hold the class outside and enjoy the warm weather and coffee simultaneously (weather permitting). Hope to see you there!

image

Top: Jeremy demonstrates brewing coffee with the Vacuum Siphon Pot.

Bottom left: Brew school attendee, Liz, gets her hands on French press to brew up a fresh pot for everyone to sample.

Bottom right: Jeremy explains the importance of pouring water to the correct level to allow the coffee to bloom.